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GREAT FOR


SET 2 ■ Physical Activity for Reducing Cholesterol


■ Physical Activity for Preventing Falls


■ Physical Activity for Postive Mental Health


■ General Benefits of Physical Activity for Health


BUY SET 2


Physical Activity Promotion days GP Surgeries Hospitals Sports medicine clinics


Health clinics Public libraries Schools and colleges Leisure and fitness clubs


Visit the Posters section of the sportEX website


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & DIABETES


HOW DOES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY HELP WITH DIABETES? Exe


some cases insulin injections or tablets a


rcise along with a good diet and in re the main ways of keeping blood glu-


cose levels as near to normal as possible.


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CAN ALSO HELP: ■ Lower your risk of heart disease ■ Lower your risk of suffering a stroke ■ Lower your risk of developing diabetes by between 35-50%


■ Prevent and reduce weight gain ■ Lower your risk of suffering from osteoporosis or osteoarthritis


■ Reduce and prevent low back pain ■ Promote mental well-being ■ Lower your risk of suffering from cancer


■ Reduce stress and promote a feeling of well-being


■ Promote a good night’s sleep ■ Lower your blood pressure ■ Lower your risk of falling ■ Improve your cholesterol profile by


increasing levels of HDL ‘


p rotective’cholestero l


WHAT IS MODERATE INTENSITY? It means breathing harder and getting warmer than normal. It does not need to be hard


. You should be able to talk and be active at the same time. WHAT TYPES? Anything that makes you breathe harder.For example:


■ walking, cycling and swimming ■ climbing stairs or escalators ■ mowing the lawn or hoovering■ washing floors or windows ■ dancing or playing tennis■ walking the dog ■ painting and decorating


Produced by


HOW MUCH ACTIVITY? Adults of all ages need to do at least 30 minutes a day of moderate intensity physical activity on 5 or more days of the week. This can be divided into smaller more f


requent sessions of for


example 3 x 10 minutes. Children and young people should


aim for at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity each day.


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR REDUCING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE


HOW DOES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY HELP HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE? Regular physical activity helps reduce blood pressure by improving the effi- ciency of the body in utilising available oxygen. The body is then able to do more activity with less oxygen.


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CAN HELP: ■ Lower your risk of heart disease


■ Lower your risk of suffering a stroke ■ Lower your risk of developing diabetes


■ Prevent and reduce weight gain ■ Lower your risk of suffering from osteoporosis and osteoarthritis


■ Reduce and prevent low back pain ■ Lower your risk of suffering from cancer


■ Reduce stress and promote a feeling of well-being


The information on this poster is based on advice published in the Chief Medical Officer’s Report “At Least Five a Week: Evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health” (published April 2004)


■ Promote a good night’s sleep ■ Lower your risk of falling ■ Improve your cholesterol profile by increasing levels of HDL ‘rotective’ cholestero


p l WHAT TY EP S? Anything that makes you breathe harder.For example:


■ walking, cycling and swimming ■ climbing stairs or escalators ■ mowing the lawn or hoovering■ washing floors or windows


Produced by ■ dancing or playing tennis■ walking the dog ■ painting and decorating HOW MU HC ACT VI ITY?


Adults of all ages need to do at least 30 minutes a day of moderateintensity physical activity on 5 or more days of the week.


Children and young people should aim for at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity each day.


WHAT IS MODERATE I TN EN TSI Y?


It means breathing harder and getting warmer than normal. It does not need to . You should be able to talk and


be hard be active at the same time.


The information on this poster is based on advice published in the Chief Medical Officer’s Report“At Least Five a Week: Evidence on the impact o pf hysical acti itv y and its re t o


la i nship to health” (published April 2004)


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