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REHABILITATION IN THE WORKPLACE


WORKPLACE POPULATION GROUP


STARTER PACK


8 X 25


MEGA PACK


8 X 100


Tennis elbow (RH25) Carpal tunnel syndrome (RH27) Chronic lower back pain (RH29) Stretching the upper body (RH31) Weight loss (MC08) During pregnancy (MC36) Reducing cholesterol (MC37) Smoking cessation (MC44)


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


SINGLE TOPIC 1 X 100


OTHER TREATMENT OPTIONS


 Stop the activity responsible until you have sought medical advice.


 Ice the elbow for five minutes every 15 minutes if possible.


 Physical therapy can help in the first instance.


 Take anti-inflammatories for one week (provided you have no allergies or gastric irritation).


 Do regular stretching exercises like the ones in this leaflet. It may be


useful obtaining a wrist/forearm splint to help rest the inflamed tendon.


 Injections should be considered if the exercises have not helped. You are more likely to obtain a longer lasting result from an injection.


 Surgery can be carried out under local injection (subcutaneous tenotomy) with a 95% success rate and no reduction in grip strength.


Advice for


'tennis' elbow CONTACT DETAILS OTHER INFORMATION


YOUR INJURY Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is an inflammation of the outer elbow where the tendon attaches to the bone. It is caused by the repetitive movements and the gripping actions common in tennis hence the term ‘tennis’ elbow. However it may also occur in other activities requiring repetitive gripping actions. Unfortunately rest as a treatment is rarely helpful.


PREVENTION Try the following modifications to the equipment causing your 'tennis' elbow: a lighter racket, increase grip size, use string vibration dampners, reduce string tension, increase racket head size, play with newer balls, more flexible racket shaft, don't play with


Upper arm


injury


Area most affected in tennis elbow - where several tendons attach to one area of the bone


Lower arm


Bony part of elbow often called the ‘funny bone’


Side view of the outside of the elbow showing the muscles and tendons responsible for 'tennis elbow’


wet balls and use softer grip material. These changes refer to tennis rackets but some changes are relevant to tools/work equipment also.


Produced by


SHOP FOR PRINTED LEAFLETS ON MEDICAL CONDITIONS


STAYING SAFE CONTINUED  If you have, or have recently had, a


respiratory infection, cut down on the amount of physical activity you do until you are well.


 Avoid activity if you have significant asthma symptoms before you start the exercise.


 Activities with intermittent periods of exertion such as golf and tennis or team sports such as football, netball and volleyball are less likely to cause asthma symptoms.


 Activities like yoga can also be particularly beneficial as it teaches proper breathing techniques.


 Make sure you spend 10 minutes cooling down at the end of each exercise session as this will help reduce the risk of getting asthma symptoms.


CONTACT DETAILS


 If you are playing sport at a competitive level, find out from the relevant sporting governing body which asthma medications are permitted as some are classed as performance-enhancing drugs and prohibited.


 Physical activity – as well as viral infections, cold weather, pollens and animal dander, are common triggers of asthma, but symptoms can be prevented by appropriate management.


MORE INFORMATION


 National Asthma Campaign 0845 701 0302 and www.asthma.org.uk


 NHS Direct 0845 4647 or www.nhsdirect.co.uk


OTHER INFORMATION


Physical activity and


asthma


WHAT IS ASTHMA? Asthma is a condition that affects the airways which carry air in and out of the lungs. If you have asthma your airways are particularly sensitive and may be inflamed. Your asthma is likely to be triggered by irritants like cold air, dust, pollen, smoke, exercise and dander (animal hair and dust).


The symptoms of asthma vary but the most common symptom is coughing. Contrary to popular belief wheezing is not always present. Other symptoms include a shortness of breath, or a tight feeling in your chest.


EXERCISE AND ASTHMA Asthma is no obstacle to exercise and playing sport. Many Olympic


WHO IS SPORTEX We specialise in producing information for medical, health and exercise professionals on the subject of exercise, health and musculoskeletal injury. This includes subscription publications for practitioners and advice handouts for the public. All our material is written and reviewed by leading medical professionals. For more information visit www.sportex.net or telephone +44 (0)845 652 1906.


Produced by © 2011 Centor Publishing Ltd


competitors, footballers and elite sports people have asthma. Research also suggests that around 80% of people with asthma have symptoms that are triggered by exercise.


It is thought that the increased intake of air due to a faster breathing rate, makes it more difficult for the nose and airways to warm and moisten the air being breathed in. Therefore the air is colder and dryer than in normal breathing circumstances. It is thought that this may trigger asthma. However there are many ways that you can minimise the chances of this occuring (see Staying safe) and the health benefits of participating in regular physical activity far outweigh any drawbacks.


ADAPTATIONS FOR ACTIVE DAILY LIVING CONTINUED


or bag (if you are caught out in a restaurant) in the ‘small’ of your back where it helps to maintain normal curvature of the spine and prevents slumping. Try turning a chair around backwards and straddling the seat. The back of the chair will support the trunk. When hoovering - use a vacuum that is not heavy and which has a height- adjustable handle. Keep the handle close to your stomach, keep upright and


keep moving your feet to avoid stooping. If you clean your teeth at a low basin - to avoid stooping move your feet wider apart to lower your trunk. You could place one hand on the sink for support and bend at the hips keeping a straight back or raise one foot on to a ledge (if there is one), or try sitting down. Alternatively you could always install a higher basin!


Exercises for low back pain CONTACT DETAILS OTHER INFORMATION STAYING SAFE CONTINUED


clean and dry and regularly check them for any sore areas.


 If you have any eye problems or high blood pressure avoid strenuous activity or lifting heavy weights.


If you get any of the following problems, get medical advice from your GP or by contacting NHS Direct (see box):  Discomfort in your chest or upper body


 Uncomfortable or severe breathlessness brought on by physical activity during your activity


 Dizziness or nausea on exertion  Fainting during or just after doing physical activity


 Palpitations (a very fast or irregular heart beat) during activity.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


 Diabetes UK 0845 120 2960 and www.diabetes.org.uk


 BBC Online Health www.bbc.co.uk/health/diabetes/


 NHS Direct 0845 4647 or www.nhsdirect.co.uk


CONTACT DETAILS OTHER INFORMATION


WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too high because the body cannot use it properly. Glucose comes from the digestion of various foods and is also manufactured by the liver. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, is responsible for transporting the glucose from the blood to the muscles of the body where the glucose is used as fuel.


WHO IS SPORTEX We specialise in producing information for medical, health and exercise professionals on the subject of exercise, health and musculoskeletal injury. This includes subscription publications for practitioners and advice handouts for the public. All our material is written and reviewed by leading medical professionals. For more information visit www.sportex.net or telephone +44 (0)845 652 1906.


© 2011 Centor Publishing Ltd


There are two types of diabetes, type 1, also known as insulin dependent diabetes and type 2 which may be known as non-insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops if the body is unable to produce any insulin. Type 2 develops when the body is able to make some insulin but doesn't make enough or can't utilise


what it does make. Exercise along with a good diet and in some cases insulin injections or tablets are the main ways of keeping blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible.


If there is not enough insulin to carry the glucose in the blood to the muscles, chemical messengers in the muscle continue to relay requests for glucose to fuel their work. With no insulin to transport this glucose the blood just continues to rise.


High levels of glucose in the blood is known as hyperglycaemia. The opposite scenario is too little glucose in the blood which is called hypoglycaemia. This can be caused by an injection of too much insulin or an insufficient intake of carbohydrates meaning there is no glucose available.


Produced by Physical activity and


YOUR INJURY Chronic low back pain often results from a weakness in the muscles supporting your back which may lead to instability or incorrect functioning of the lower part of the spine (lumbar spine). Strengthening the muscles responsible for providing support to the spine is therefore very important. You need to remember to strengthen your stomach muscles as well as your back muscles so that your spine is equally supported at both the front and the back. Loss of stability in your spine can lead to microscopic damage to the surrounding soft tissues so it is particularly important to address this problem quickly to minimise damage.


You can actively manage your back by: remaining active in all settings (e.g. at home, at work, at leisure); keeping


An imbalance between the multifidus


muscle in the back (shown) and one of


the stomach muscles at the front of the body is


believed to be a significant


factor in low back pain


Image showing a key muscle in low back pain diabetes


mobile and fit; making an early return to normal activities following an acute attack of low back pain, then gradually and progressively returning to regular physical activity and finally staying at work (bed rest, which was once recommended, usually makes the situation worse).


Produced by


health activity


sports


care


sports medicine


health activity


sports caresportsmedicine


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