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Lobster crackers, oyster knives and lobster forks


WORLD OF OYSTERS The next day we drive to Fernwood


on PEI’s south coast for Future Seafood’s Tong & Shuck oyster-harvesting tour. Out on the water’s mirror-like


A lobster boat returns to harbour at Howards Cove, on PEI’s west coast.


surface our guide Brian Lewis expertly demonstrates the art of oyster tonging before we have a go ourselves. Using his two oyster tongs in a scissor-like action on the estuary bed, he digs up a catch and places it on a small platform at- tached to the boat. Amongst the weed and mud are the jewels of PEI’s seafood crown. A typical oyster will take three years to mature, and any that don’t make the size limit go back in the water for another day. After our thoroughly enjoyable insight into the world of oysters, we cross to the island’s north coast, where standing proudly near the east end of the Prince Edward Island National Park, and overlooking the beach named after it, is the historic mansion of Dalvay-by- the-Sea built in 1895. Easily the most stunning accommodation on the north shore, Dalvay-by-the-Sea was thrown into world consciousness, when Wil- liam and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, visited as part of their royal tour to Canada in July 2011, where amongst other activities, they tasted some of the chef ’s seafood delicacies. On the morning of day six, we drive


Andersons Creek Golf Club


from Dalvay-by-the-Sea to the far west of PEI for our final round at Mill River Golf Course. “This mature forest course is a test


for anyone, and you would have to go a long way to find as many doglegs as here,” says head professional Mark Roberts. “It’s a strategist’s course where you have to really plot your way around. If you try and cut corners you will be in trouble. Keep an eye out for our signa- ture hole, the par-4 7th that is featured in “1001 Golf Holes: You Must Play Before You Die.” You have to pick a side and commit to it.” From Mill River, a short scenic


coastal drive takes us to a unique ac- commodation for our last night. Built in 1875, the historic West Point Light- house is the island’s tallest, and sec- tions of the former lighthouse keepers’ quarters have been elegantly converted into a 13-room inn, the only one of its kind in Canada. After visiting the museum’s extensive


collection of lighthouse artifacts and climbing the tower for a breathtaking view, we sit down on our own private deck and uncork a bottle of chilled wine. With the waves crashing in the Northumberland Strait and the striking black-and-white lighthouse to our left, we raise our glasses to a fantastic week on Canada’s Prince Edward Island.


SPRING 2012 / NCGA.ORG / 35


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