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Now that we understand the far reaching effects of strained connective tissue, the next question becomes, how do we undo these patterns? This answer lies in their chemical makeup.


The primary constituent of connective tissue is a protein called collagen, which denatures (softens) above body temperature. In chemical terms, this characteristic is referred to as “plastic,” meaning that its shape can be changed by heat or pressure. Then, when the energy source is removed, the new shape is retained. Try this simple experiment: take a plastic bag and pull it taught between your hands. Now press your thumb firmly into the middle and remove it. The impression you’ve made remains—you have permanently altered the bag’s shape!


This same principle is used by Rolfers to realign the body. By applying precise, directed pressure, a Rolfer frees and guides these tissues into a more


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