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stronger as a result. Years later, long after the fall from the tree has been forgotten, you find you now have a “good” leg; it’s the one you stand on while waiting in line, use to push off with when jumping and so on. But this imbalance doesn’t stop at the legs. Being vertically aligned, it sets off a chain reaction of compensations that ripple through the rest of the body.


To offset this leg imbalance, your hip and spinal muscles must also adjust, which throws strain up into your back and shoulders and ultimately affects your neck. Having nowhere else to go, the tension starts building there and your muscles tighten, restricting blood, lymph and nerve flow, which further aggravates the situation. You rub your neck, but the pain won’t go away. One morning you wake up with a tingling sensation in your arm. Tension headaches soon follow and begin to cloud your thinking. You start to feel “stressed.” Seeking relief, you go to the gym, take yoga classes, get weekly massages and visit every


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