This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LEGISLATION & PROCEDURE


KEEPING UP WITH H&S LEGISLATION


Ann Clarke, Design Director of Claremont Group Interiors looks at how health and safety legislation will change and what to keep an eye on in upcoming months.


subject of debate. As is often the case with such legislation, its effects will only be known in practice, not theory.


LOCALISM BILL Published in December 2010 and coming into force in large part in April this year, the Localism Bill is designed to shift the balance of power from central government towards local communities. The bill has the potential to transform the structure of the UK, changing the way we own assets and run services. It will also have a profound effect on property markets, although how exactly that will manifest itself continues to be the


38


The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and British Property Federation (BPF) are two organisations who have welcomed the Localism Bill. Amongst other things the Bill will give councils greater control over business rates and give local communities more control over local planning decisions including the transfer of usage between domestic and commercial property. If implemented properly and positively, this can only be a positive step for local business and communities.


FLEXIBLE


WORKING In 2012, the Government is due to issue its response to last year’s consultation on workplaces, with proposals for introducing a new system of flexible parental leave, flexible working for all employees, amendments to the Working Time Regulations to allow staff to carry-forward holiday entitlements and new measures on equal pay. A response to the consultation has been delayed as a result of ‘ongoing discussions within Government’, and is now due to be published in ‘early 2012’. So watch this space.


One thing that is definitely happening in March will be new legislation in response to the revised EU Parental Leave Directive which will


see the right to unpaid parental increase from three to four months for each child under the age of five.


Of course, many companies have their own flexible working policies, many of which exceed their statutory requirements. As is always the case with new legislation however, what actually happens as a result of its introduction is not easy to predict. Certainly it would be a shame if new legislation in this area discouraged firms from taking on staff.


THE WORKING


TIME DIRECTIVE Discussions on a range of proposals to change the EU directive have been ongoing for some time, including on the option for workers to opt-out of the maximum average 48-hour working





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60