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ELECTRICAL SAFETY


WHERE THERE’S SMOKE…


Leading fire risk expert pushes for even tougher fire safety law enforcement as fire safety offenders are jailed.


A leading expert on the fire dangers caused by uncleaned kitchen extract ducts has called for greater enforcement of the law requiring kitchen extract ducts to be cleaned frequently.


Two recent fires in Burger King fast food restaurants in London, one at Liverpool Street station last November and another during this June at the Burger King in High Holborn, have followed a spate of fires in restaurant kitchens in central London during the last year.


Gary Nicholls, Managing Director of Swiftclean Environmental, has played a major part in helping the Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA), The Heating and Ventilation Contractors Association (HVCA) and CIBSE to produce standards and guides to good practice relating to ventilation system hygiene and ductwork fire safety cleaning. He also acts as an expert witness to assist civil courts on technical issues relating to ventilation hygiene matters.


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Gary Nicholls makes the point that the London Fire and Rescue Service has been able to link many of the fires in restaurants and fast food kitchens to uncleaned, or inadequately cleaned, kitchen extract systems which are installed to remove fumes containing particles of flammable fats


and cooking oil residues from the kitchen.


“It is legally necessary for all restaurants, fast food outlets and other commercial kitchens in the UK to prepare and maintain a fire safety risk assessment, and to have the kitchen extract duct(s) cleaned and maintained


regularly to remove flammable fats and grease and repair any breakages or gaps in the duct” he said.


“This requirement became law in 2006 with the implementation of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order. Tougher enforcement of the law is needed to reduce the


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