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OVENS, CONVEYOR


 ®     


Lincoln Impinger® Conveyor Ovens are the premier continuous cook platforms in the foodservice industry. The Impinger® product offering now includes the new 3255 and 3270. Individually, each oven has a 32" wide conveyor belt and 55" or 70" baking chamber. Triple stacked, it puts incredible baking capacity and flexibility in a modest amount of space.


Each oven features a stainless steel interior and is available in natural and propane gas. These new platforms come standard with FastBake™.


™


This new patent-pending airflow management system provides a much higher level of heat transfer; as the efficiency of heat transfer increases, the bake time required decreases. FastBake is revolutionizing pizza — creating a faster and better quality bake!


Additional Features: • Stainless steel construction


• Front-facing digital control panel


• Spacious baking chamber (55" on the 3255 and 70" on the 3270)


• Removable large front panel for easy cleaning


• Standard sandwich door • Stackable up to 3 high • LPG available • CSA International, UL Sanitation


The Impinger® Low Profile conveyorized oven gives you full-size capacity in a lower profile. These high-production ovens can be stacked up to 3 high in the same footprint as 1 oven. The Low Profile can replace up to 5 deck ovens, up to 5 full-size convection ovens, and up to 15 microwave ovens. The Impinger Low Profile will bake, cook, reheat, and finish virtually any food item 2 - 4 times faster than conventional ovens. Now available with new FastBake™ technology.


• 441 ⁄8" high (single oven), 633


• 32" wide conveyor belt • 110,000 BTU/hr. • 120 , 14 amps, 60 Hz, 1 ph • LPG available • CSA International, ISO 9001


stacked), 663 wide, 56" deep


 One Conveyor Oven


in use for 6 hours per day


 $2,277


 $6,207


 





These operating costs are based on an average electric cost of 10.26 cents/kWh, including fuel cost, taxes and demand charges. The gas cost used is 91.5 cents/therm. (Your average may be higher or lower.) Costs are based on the national average commercial prices for 2010 as published in the Monthly Energy Review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) – Energy Information Administration.


⁄8 ⁄8" high (triple stacked), 795


" high (double ⁄8


"


  


Can you say WOW? Our customers say that after they see the Middleby Marshall WOW! Oven. With guaranteed energy savings, the fastest cook time in the industry and the exclusive cool-to-touch outer shell for employee safety, there in no comparison.


Featuring a 40-inch belt and the fastest bake times in conveyor oven technology, the Middleby Marshall PS640 is made for the busy pizza store with a smaller foot print.


Operators are most excited about the Middleby Marshall patented energy savings technology. The Middleby Marshall energy eye senses when product is placed on the conveyor to be baked, and the oven will power up to full cooking mode. The conveyor motor goes into a “sleep mode” when the oven is not in use. The PS640 uses 30 percent less energy than other conveyor ovens – we guarantee it. The WOW! PS640 will pay for itself quickly in lower energy bills from the moment the oven is turned on.


Operators are happy with the fastest bake times in the industry and employees are working in a safer environment around a cool- to-touch oven. Call today to schedule your visit to the Middleby Marshall test bake center.


32nd Edition FO


ODSERVICE GAS EQUIPMENT CATALOG 85


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