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Sustainable cleaning in the workplace


Stan Atkins, Group Chief Executive Officer of the British Institute of Cleaning Science, gives us practical advice for implementing sustainable cleaning into the workplace.


Sustainable cleaning is the process of using resources in a manner that doesn’t damage the environment or people in it, to meet human needs not only now, but for generations to come. Sustainability is a widely used term, but more needs to be done to implement it into day-to-day cleaning practices. This requires industry investment in research and development and training and education if sustainability in cleaning is to be fully achieved.


To help the cleaning industry implement achievable sustainable working practices, the British Institute of Cleaning Science is launching an inaugural education conference, ‘Green and keen cleaning workforces’, in June, which will explore how the industry can set new environmental and sustainable standards, share industry best practice in this area, with specific sustainable actions that can be implemented in the workplace.


Why sustainability is key? Sustainable cleaning is not just beneficial


Share sustainability


best practice To find out more about implementing sustainable working practices attend the British Institute of Cleaning Science Inaugural Conference ‘Green and keen cleaning workforces - setting new environmental and training standards in the cleaning industry.’


to the environment but can also help towards significantly reducing costs. The latest environmentally friendly cleaning systems are cost effective and minimise the economic impact of health problems, whilst reviewing energy consumption and waste recycling can also bring down costs. Increasingly, regulation is also being introduced to set targets.


How to implement sustainable working practices


Implementing sustainable working practices in your workplace doesn’t have to be complicated. Outlined below are five key areas where you can improve your company’s sustainability straight away:


1) Cleaning Products Always strive to buy products that do not directly damage the environment. It should be emphasised that there are many less harmful, greener and just as effective cleaning products available. Use biodegradable substances wherever possible. If a cleaning company supplies cleaning products to your facility,


The event takes place at Manchester United’s Football Stadium conference centre, in Salford Suite 1 in the North Stand Level 4, on the 23rd June from 9.15am - 4:00pm.


Register by emailing conference@bics.org.uk or telephone Ceris Burns International on 01825 714329.


ask them what they use. The HSE website contains useful information.


2) Training and accreditation Environmental standards should be backed up with evidence such as accreditations like ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management certificate. Companies should also be able to provide an environmental policy statement and provide proof of accredited training in this area.


3) Daytime Cleaning Daytime cleaning is becoming increasingly popular with companies across the UK. Cleaning during the day can reduce companies’ energy consumption, costs, and light pollution, as the need to keep the building running throughout the night is eliminated. If you can implement daytime cleaning into your workplace your company will be considerably more sustainable, benefitting both the environment and your company’s overheads. Some companies are happy to clean early mornings, before opening hours, or after closing to suit a client’s requirements.


4) Cleaning Systems The energy consumption of your cleaning equipment can quickly amass; therefore it is important to review the cleaning systems that you use carefully.


5) Waste Management Cleaning companies should have a waste recycling policy and buy goods that have as little packaging as possible. Endeavour to purchase goods, supplies and equipment manufactured with a high proportion of raw materials sourced from reprocessed waste.


www.bics.org.uk


The future of our cleaning industry | TOMORROW’S CLEANING | 43 SUSTAINABLE CLEANING


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