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LEVELS OF EDUCATIONAL


“ It was as if people decided that if clinical psychologists looked like elementary school teachers, in that they were women, people wanted to pay them like elementary school teachers.”—RENEE GARFINKEL


However, Garfi nkel says that as women


slowly became 50 percent or more of clinical psychologists, “it had a devaluing eff ect on the profession. T e incomes of clinical psychologists declined as the number of women in the profession increased. It was as if people decided that if clinical psycholo- gists looked like elementary school teachers, in that they were women, people wanted to pay them like elementary school teachers.” T e White House report also notes that


married women who are working can expect family and household responsibilities to take up more of their time than that of their hus- bands. On the average, married women in the workforce spend 1.6 hours in household activities and an additional one hour caring for children or other family members. T eir husbands spend signifi cantly less time—just


less than one hour in household chores and 40 minutes caring for others. T e fi ndings of the White House report


lead us to suggest a few recommendations for women who want to succeed in the legal profession. Getting a law degree increases one’s chances of earning a good living throughout life. It’s probably better to defer marriage until you have started your career. Child-rearing can be part of a fully successful life. Out-and-out discrimination is unlikely, but be aware of subtle bias and of the possibility that occupations with signifi cant female representation, including areas of law in which women predominate, are still stigmatized. D&B


Jonathan Groner is a freelance writer based in Washington, D.C.


27 27 25 23 21 19 17


MEDIAN AGE AT FIRST MARRIAGE (1950-2009)


Men Women


ATTAINMENT (Percentage of adults 19 and older, 1970 and 2009)


Graduate degree Bachelor’s degree Some college High school or equivalent Less than high school


1970


Men


35


Women 2009


Men


1950


1957


1964


1971


1978


1985


1992


1999


2006 Women


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