This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WOMEN AND MINORITY ATTORNEYS IN


LEADERSHIP ROLES Management-level committee representation as of 2009


EXECUTIVE/MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE


White/Caucasian women


14.73%


Minority women 1.33% Minority men 4.17% All women 16.06% All minorities 5.50%


HIRING COMMITTEE


White/Caucasian women


29.07%


Minority women 7.05% Minority men 8.35% All women 36.12% All minorities 15.40%


PARTNER REVIEW COMMITTEE


White/Caucasian women


17.42% 34


Minority women 1.01% Minority men 4.81% All women 18.43% All minorities 5.82%


ASSOCIATE REVIEW COMMITTEE


White/Caucasian women


23.90%


Minority women 3.73% Minority men 5.50% All women 27.63% All minorities 9.24%


DIVERSITY COMMITTEE


White/Caucasian women


27.88%


Minority women 19.10% Minority men 21.04% All women 46.98% All minorities 40.15%


OTHER LEADERSHIP ROLES ALL WOMEN


department leaders


(WHITE AND MINORITY) U.S. offi ce heads 15.13% Practice group/


18.07% Committee leaders 27.52%


ALL MINORITY ATTORNEYS (MEN AND WOMEN)


department leaders


U.S. offi ce heads 6.30% Practice group/


5.15% Committee leaders 11.37% DIVERSITY & THE BAR® MAY/JUNE 2011 MCCA.COM


T


T is may change in the near future. T e report notes that women have made surprisingly rapid advances in terms of enrollment and graduation from college and graduate school. In 2008, out of all high school graduates, 72 percent of the women immediately enrolled in college, but only 66 percent of the men did. In 2008, women also constituted 57 percent of undergraduate enrollment. T at same year, the study shows women


accounted for 59 percent of graduate school enrollment. And more women than men received doctoral degrees. As recently as 1998, men received more doctorates than women. T e available data for women attorneys


closely parallel the White House report fi ndings. According to reliable data from other studies, in 2009, women made up 44 percent of law school enrollment, up from 16 percent in 1974.


Unequal Pay for Women Lawyers Despite women’s academic achievements, the wage gap and the achievement gap persist in the legal profession. Even though


RELEVANT DEFINITIONS FROM


LAW FIRM DIVERSITY SURVEY MANAGEMENT-LEVEL COMMITTEES:


Executive/Management Committee The fi rm’s chief governing body responsible for the strategy and future growth of the fi rm.


Hiring Committee The committee or other group that leads the fi rm’s activities with regard to the recruitment and hiring of associates.


women constitute 32 percent of all U.S. attorneys, they represent only 19 percent of the partners in the nation’s largest law fi rms. And in 2009, according to the National Association of Women Lawyers, women equity partners in major fi rms earned only 88 percent of the income earned by their male equity partners. Meanwhile, women who were nonequity partners made 92 percent of their male counterparts’ compensation. T e White House report suggests that


as more women with college, graduate, and professional degrees enter the labor force, their average earnings will increase. Some working women believe, however, that it may not be easy for women to make up the earnings gap, even as their levels of education increase. Renee Garfi nkel, 60, is a clinical


psychologist in private practice in Washington, D.C. She recalls seeing overt discrimination against women in gradu- ate school when she was a student in the 1970s, a phenomenon that she doesn’t see anymore. “As an undergraduate, I was told by


the chairman of a graduate school in psychology that he would discriminate against me and other women. He felt that the time and energy spent on women students wasn’t worth it because they would only have children and leave the profession,” Garfi nkel recalls.


Partner Review Committee The committee or other group that reviews and evaluates the perfor- mance of partners for the purposes of advancement and compensation.


Associate Review Committee The committee or other group that reviews and evaluates the perfor- mance of associates for the purposes of advance- ment and compensation.


Other leadership roles Leaders of affi nity groups or other groups that count attorneys as members.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48