This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WHO SAID IT’S LONELY AT THE TOP? For Wilson, whose practice encompasses commercial and environmental litigation, organizing colleagues near and far allows members of this close-knit network to make the most of their professional contacts. T ey refer clients to one another, stay abreast of important events, and discuss the unique set of challenges aff ect- ing diverse attorneys. “We attempted to organize in the past, but we


were unable to sustain it. What’s diff erent this time around is that everyone is there to help, so it didn’t become a one-person job,” says Wilson, who is also a founding member of the broader Diverse Partners Network, an organization that focuses on partners of all ethnic backgrounds. “We’re looking less for a messiah and more to collaborate for change. Each of us takes turns heading up various programs. Five or six times a year, we have programs for summer associ- ates. We had a program for new partners. We also identifi ed a number of women partners to be dynamic leaders in our group.” One of those dynamic women leaders is Grace


20


Speights, a partner in Morgan, Lewis & Bockius’ labor and employment practice and managing partner of the fi rm’s Washington, D.C., offi ce. A self-proclaimed “lifer” at the fi rm, Speights joined Morgan Lewis in 1984 as an associate. She rose up through the ranks, serving in various leadership and management roles, and was made partner in 1991. Over the years, she says she’s seen the number of partners of color increase slowly but steadily. She credits affi nity networks such as those established for women and people of color as a key component to sustaining diversity within the legal fi eld—and at the critical partner level, where women attorneys and attorneys of color are disproportionately underrepresented.


“ THERE’S NO ROAD MAP, BUT ULTIMATELY WHAT PARTNERS AND CLIENTS WANT IS TO SEE A PERSON WHO PROVIDES VALUE AND GOOD JUDGMENT.” — JOHN DANIELS JR.


DIVERSITY & THE BAR® MAY/JUNE 2011 MCCA.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48