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Expert from overseas: A Game Plan for Imple


Greetings from sunny California! As your new columnist from across the seas, I’m going to use my 40+ years of experience in the cleaning


industry to provide solid, proven solutions that you can apply immediately to your operation. Each month, I’ll share perspectives from the many facets of the industry I’ve experienced personally, from sales rep, to distributor, to manager of an in-house department at a huge multi-national organization.


Technology is a great subject to begin with because in the cleaning business, nearly everyone claims to be on the cutting edge


of technology, but few actually are. There are usually three major objections to investing in new technology. This month, I’ll tackle the first two:


1. Why should I invest in new technology if what I’m using now works fine?


If you haven’t invited your distributor or manufacturer’s rep in to show you what’s new lately, there’s a good chance what you’re using now is obsolete. There are new systems and technologies being introduced every week, and you can be fairly sure that your competition has jumped onboard. While it’s impossible to invest in every new product that comes along, a technology update is almost guaranteed to help you increase productivity, improve the


WORLD NEWS 16 | TOMORROW’S CLEANING | The future of our cleaning industry


quality of cleaning and impact sustainability.


Improvements to scrubber dryers, for example, allow you to maintain floors faster than ever. If you increase productivity, you’re essentially reducing labour costs — which account for up to 70% of your total cleaning budget. In addition, new machines minimise the use of chemicals, saving money upfront, while creating a healthier internal environment and lessening the impact on the external environment.


Technology has even affected how cleaning crews approach a workspace. With the increasing cost of commercial real estate, many employers are reducing their allocated space per employee. Workers who previously had 500 square feet of office space may have


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