This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A Cl ose r L ook a t P ore G e om e try X - ra y c om p ute d tom og ra p h y h a s a d v a nc e d th e  e l d of m e d ic ine f or m ore th a n 3 0 y e a rs.


F or ne a rl y a s l ong , it h a s a l so be e n a v a l ua bl e tool f or g e osc ie ntists. I m p rov e m e nts in th e te c h nol og y a re h e l p ing g e osc ie ntists unc ov e r g re a te r d e ta il in th e inte rna l p ore struc ture of re se rv oir roc k a nd a c h ie v e a be tte r und e rsta nd ing of c ond itions th a t a f f e c t p rod uc tion.


A nd re a s K a y se r Cambridge, England


M a rk K na c k ste d t


The Australian National University Canberra, Australia


M urta z a Z ia ud d in Sugar Land, Texas, USA


For help in preparation of this article, thanks to


V eronique Barlet-Goué dard, Gabriel Marquette, Olivier Porcherie and Gaetan Rimmelé , Clamart, France; Bruno Goffé , Ecole Normale Supé rieure, Paris; and Rachel Wood, The University of Edinburgh, Scotland.


Inside Reality and iCenter are marks of Schlumberger.


Information gained through core analysis is invaluable for predicting the producibility of a reservoir pay zone. While other methods enable petrophysicists to estimate grain size, bulk volume, saturation, porosity and permeability of formations, core samples often serve as the benchmark against which other methods are calibrated. However, notwithstanding several hundred thousand feet of whole or slabbed core residing in core libraries around the world, most wells are not cored.


The wealth of information obtained from cores comes at a price. Coring often increases rig time, lowers penetration rates and increases the risk of sticking the bottomhole assembly. At some wells, hostile downhole or surface conditions make coring too risky. In other cases, correla- tions are not sufficient to allow geologists to accurately and confidently pick coring points. Instead, many operators rely on sidewall cores obtained through prospective pay zones, and may compensate for lack of whole core data by supplementing their usual logging program with a wider range of measurements.


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Oilfield Review


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