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GenQuip meets challenging requirements


Welfare unit manufacturer, GenQuip, has increased production of LPG powered cabins due to rising demand from contractors operating in remote areas, such as forestry and agricultural workers. “One of our clients, who undertook contracts in remote woodland


environments, was finding it difficult to transport diesel fuel in these areas,” said Business Development Manager, Peter Beach. “They raised fears that leakage or spillage of diesel fuel could harm the environment in these locations. We also discovered that some water treatment plants were considering a complete ban on diesel engine generators.”


Sumner success for M+S Hire Power


Paul and Jaime Munkenbeck (pictured below) from M+S Hire Power of Twickenham struck it lucky at the Executive Hire Show, winning a Sumner 2412 lift in a prize draw held at the end of the exhibition. Rupert Organ, European Sales Manager with Sumner Manufacturing UK, reported an excellent Show in terms of quality visitors and enquiries.


• Other winners at the Show included Phil Cross of DEH Equipment Hire


Centre of Stoke, who won the Innovation Zone prize draw. He has already put his £500 cheque towards a Teletower from Zarges (UK), which was the winning Zone product.


And a cheque for £250 is on its way to Simon Jones of Daventry-based Plantool, whose Show questionnaire was drawn from those sent by hirers.


The version of GenQuip’s welfare cabin powered by a generator with an engine fuelled entirely from LPG, is designed to provide several benefits, including lower running costs, easier refuelling and quieter operation with reduced emissions. The manufacturer has also developed an all-terrain welfare unit, incorporating a raised chassis, off-road tyres and built-in steps for safer access.


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