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The year for daytime cleaning?


WILL 2011 BE THE YEAR WHEN DAYTIME CLEANING BECOMES NORMAL? GORDON MCVEAN OF TRUVOX INTERNATIONAL OFFERS SOME THOUGHTS.


More and more UK companies and organisations are embracing daytime cleaning. All sorts of factors have played a role in causing this increase – staff unwillingness to work at unsocial hours, employers’ reluctance to pay overtime rates for work at night, companies’ need to reduce energy bills and insurance issues.


On the other side of the equation, traditional unwillingness on the part of managerial staff to have cleaners in evidence during the day is becoming less of a problem, and companies’ concerns about daytime cleaning deterring customers (for example, in supermarkets or car showrooms) has been proved to be largely groundless.


However, daytime cleaning brings issues of its own that have to be overcome. For the presence of cleaning staff to be acceptable while a business or organisation’s staff are working, or retail customers are buying food, cleaners must be provided with clean uniforms so that the public image of the customer organisation is not at risk of damage.


Health and safety issues occur - trailing wires from machines, wet floors and the risk of people tripping or slipping on them, insurance in case such things occur and the provision of signage cautioning staff and customers to take care. Cleaning contractors need precisely detailed contracts with daytime cleaning customers specifying exactly who is responsible for what in respect of accidents and insurance.


Noise can be an issue, especially where the organisation’s staff are paid for their cerebral skills rather than for manual dexterity. So also can the odours of cleaning chemicals and the potential for some of them to irritate the nasal or bronchial tracts of staff who are asthmatic, bronchitic or subject to rhinitis.


Nonetheless, economic pressures acting upon companies and organisations in difficult times will create opportunities for cleaning contractors who are willing to modify their working practices and equip with machines more suitable for the daytime cleaning environment.


As more and more customer organisations decide to adopt daytime cleaning, the bandwagon will roll and the pace will become unstoppable. 2011 could be the year of the breakthrough.


Different equipment? So think about the types of equipment that daytime cleaning will require. For a start, it is almost always true that new machines are quieter than old ones. This is sometimes because of improved technology, such as quieter motors or new kinds of bearings, but is also generally true because extensive use causes wear, and worn motors and bearings generate more noise than new ones.


You may already have scrubber dryers that leave the floor virtually dry at the end of the operating cycle so that the risk of accidents caused by slippery floors is virtually eliminated.


34 | TOMORROW’S CLEANING | The future of our cleaning industry FEATURE


You may already use battery-powered machines that have no trailing power lead for people to trip over – but if you do not, you may have to progressively re-equip to secure daytime cleaning contracts.


Another issue is manoeuvrability. Increased pressure by financial managements to maximise the use of space in commercial buildings, particularly office space now dictates that every space is used to the legal maximum. Desks closer together means less space to manoeuvre, so you need compact machines that can tackle tight corners, fit in smaller spaces.


Truvox International can provide the key machines that you need to achieve quieter cleaning, dryer floors, battery power and greater manoeuvrability. Plus more cleaning speed and all the reliability you could wish for. For advice contact Truvox on +44 (0)23 8070 2200.


www.truvox.com


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