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THE A.I.S.E. CHARTER FOR SUSTAINABLE CLEANING EXPLAINS HOW WE CAN REDUCE THE FOOTPRINT OF THE DETERGENTS AND MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS INDUSTRY.


The A.I.S.E. Charter for Sustainable Cleaning is the industry sector’s concrete, proactive program for translating the concept of sustainable development into reality and actions. It was launched in 2005 in all EU countries, plus Iceland, Norway, and Switzerland, covering all product categories of the industry, in both the household, the industrial and institutional sectors.


The Charter is a lifecycle analysis (LCA) based framework. It promotes and facilitates a common industry approach on sustainability practice and reporting.


Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) - The Charter also defines a set of Key Performance Indicators which are specifically linked to the CSPs. Companies that sign up to the Charter are required to report annually to A.I.S.E. on these KPIs. A.I.S.E. collects and aggregates the results and publishes them in the annual A.I.S.E. Activity & Sustainability Report, providing measurable evidence of the progress for the whole industry sector at European level.


Product dimension - Advanced Sustainability Profiles (ASPs) - ASP status


Product made by a Charter member company and meets high sustainability standards.


The packaging in both charts is provided for illustration purposes only. The Charter logo may apply to any products of the soap, detergent and maintenance industry. Only one Charter logo may be used per pack.


Product made by a Charter member company.


The A.I.S.E. Charter covers the whole life cycle of products


In early 2011, more than 130 companies from all over Europe have so far committed to the Charter. About 80% of the industry’s output in Europe is covered.


How does it work? The Charter consists of three main components, all of which are subject to independent verification:


Charter Sustainability Procedures (CSPs) - Based on ISO 14001 and other comparable standards, a number of CSPs have been defined for companies to implement in their management systems. These CSPs must apply to a minimum of 75% of the company's production for them to become Charter members.


represents a high standard of sustainability in the product characteristics which companies can adopt. Defined per product category, the ASP criteria/thresholds are based on the main life cycle impacts. Products which meet the requirements of these ASPs may use a differentiated Charter logo on pack which signifies not only that the manufacturer is committed to certain sustainability processes at the manufacturing level, but also that the product itself meets certain advanced sustainability criteria.


Reaching out to the end-users Compliance of the Charter scheme may be displayed on products according to specific guidance provided by A.I.S.E., as illustrated below.


32 | TOMORROW’S CLEANING | The future of our cleaning industry SUSTAINABLE CLEANING


Promoting sustainable use of the industry’s products In addition to industry’s efforts, consumers and professional users have a critical role to play in ensuring that they get the best results from their products, while minimising the impact on the environment by following best-use tips displayed on the packaging.


The Charter encourages companies committed to the scheme to promote best-use tips on packaging, by featuring the www.cleanright.eu industry portal.


www.sustainable-cleaning.com


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