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responsibility of publicising it. The best thing you can do then is to offer a replacement and something else for free to show you are a decent firm.


Finally, good stories can be made totally


devalued, for example, when the company that prepared the editorial insists on having the story opposite its advertisement. The story then bears no credibility because the reader is not a twit.


There are many other examples I could give but that makes my point.


There are times to shout your news from the rooftops and then there are times when it is best to zip it and say nothing. My Dad always said: “If you haven’t got anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” He was right nine times out of ten.


So even though you think/know that your competitor’s product is rubbish/faulty/expensive/inferior, don’t actually say it. It’s best to always sow the seed of doubt in your potential customer’s mind. Without declaring war with your competitor, you can, when referring to them say: “Yes, well they’ve been around for a long time, but I don’t think their models have the capability to (enter phrase of choice here).” You should always show some respect for your competitors, as you would expect your customers to have for you.


A good example of how not to act was the 1990s TV advertising campaign for


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