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Cover Story


of this


complex and demanding market


sector sets them apart from the competition.


As the old adage goes, “the customer always knows best,” which is why ABL always makes sure that they listen to what their customers have to say. Ian Lawry, Director of ABL explains: “I have been in this industry for about 15 years and I have always listened to my customers. Regrettably, I cannot say the same for many of the companies that I have worked for. Since starting ABL I have listened and tried to put in to practice as many of our customers’ suggestions as possible.”


The feedback is always extremely positive, with some constructive suggestions. One of which was the request for a more flexible desk- mounted power module that can be mounted and used in various ways. This led ABL to launch the new Konnective 2 module, one of the most flexible power modules on the market, allowing a multitude of fixing positions.


There is, of course, one issue we have all experienced at some time or another - that stressful situation when


15


a fuse blows, taking with it a valuable electricity source along with that precious data you were working on, unsaved files or simply just an important tool, such as a desk lamp.


Ian explains: “One of the main issues that has been repeatedly mentioned is the problem surrounding downtime caused when fuses blow in these sockets. BS6396 stipulates that they should be individually fused at either 3.15A or 5A – so they are only suitable for general office equipment. Any items that are rated at more than 5 amps, including photocopiers, kettles, vacuum cleaners and fan heaters, need a separate power supply.”


Not only do blown fuses cause unwanted stress and that initial panic, (where you hope and pray that an auto-save kicked in) but it can waste valuable time,


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