This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
News


The 2010 Spending f Review: A time


or heroes


The Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR), the details of which were announced by Chancellor George Osborne last month, outlines cuts in public sector spending which are the broadest and most sweeping for a generation. Stewart Darkin reports.


Whatever the outcome of May’s General Election, addressing the UK’s record deficit was always set to be at the very top of the to-do list for the new occupants of 10 and 11 Downing Street. Indications are that whilst the public recognises that cuts must be made, there is widespread disagreement about where the axe should fall.


In order to meet the Government’s stated aim of removing the structural deficit by the financial year 2015-16, it is estimated that £83bn is required in spending cuts or taxes and the CSR is a significant step along that particularly bumpy road.


It was clear, and not altogether surprising, that the proposed cuts mean the public sector must deliver significantly more for considerably less. Health, however, remains the Government’s top priority with an annual NHS funding increase in England


12


from £98.5bn currently to £109.8bn by 2014/15. This is a reduced rate of increase which represents little gain, if any, in real terms allowing for inflation. A continual theme for delivering savings is the need to target ‘inefficiencies’ and the NHS is no exception, with the Chancellor expecting £20bn in health service efficiency savings over the period.


How this impacts on estate management in the health service is open to interpretation but given that reported backlog maintenance costs are around £4bn and many Victorian-era buildings are not fit for purpose, the NHS desperately needs improved funding for capital projects. Following the CSR, however, overall capital funding is down by £0.5bn (approximately 10%) by 2014.


Other sectors, whilst in some instances enjoying high political priority, look set


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58