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STORMSAFE VIEWS
15’ overhangs and strategically placed native landscaping cover the 48’ of glass to the east and west of the main
living area. All other windows in the house are covered with 3’ overhangs and have very little southern exposure. The builder chose Winguard, non-insulated, laminated impact glass by PGT.


WISE USE
The hallway above looks like interior space, but it’s actually outside, tucked under the eaves. It creates a deep porch on the level below. Every inch of upstairs space is used for either storage or kids’ bunk beds, creating lots of usable living space for visiting guests (and their four-legged friends).



INNOVATIVE DETAILS
The recycled theme runs throughout the house: All beds and tables were built by local craftsman Robert Steele from reclaimed and salvaged wood from Sarasota Architectural Salvage—some of it from beams taken from an old local building, the John Ringling Hotel. Decorations include marine salvage; rugs come locally from the Woman’s Exchange. The closets sport salvaged schooner sails as doors.


 


FIRST FLOOR
SPECIAL SITING
A wide west-facing “box” design is cost-effective and maximizes views and breezes. The home has 1,850-square-feet of conditioned space with four bedrooms and four baths.


CENTRAL STYLE
All of the living areas are at the center of the house, while the two first-floor bedrooms are separated from each other for privacy. Porches flank both sides of the 18’-deep house.


EXTERIOR DETAILS
The house is clad in HardiePanel and HardieTrim Batten Boards over Tyvek Housewrap. The roofing is Galvalume standing seam metal over a watertight secondary peel and stick membrance.


TIGHT ENVELOPE
Ellis used BioBased spray foam to insulate the floors underneath the elevated main living area, the roof line, and walls. It nets R-19 at the roofline and R-12 on the exterior and underside of the house.


SPACE SAVER
To keep a smaller footprint, stairwells and the upstairs hallway were placed outside conditioned space, but sheltered under the 15’-wide eaves. When the windows in those spaces are opened, they help vent hot air.


SMART STACKING
The upstairs guest rooms are mirrors of each other and share a plumbing stack for efficiency. Each suite also has a bonus room under the eaves allowing a family of five to sleep comfortably.


 


SECOND FLOOR
INSIDER TIP—DOUBLE WATER TANKS


Ellis used the short eaves space upstairs to store a single Geyser heat pump water heater. He needed to provide enough capacity for four bathrooms and an outdoor shower. So the two hot water tanks act as storage and are plumbed in line with the Geyser heat pump providing heat for the system. The heat pump runs on standard 110 volt power. As the systems use ambient hot air to heat water, they blow out colder air, cooling the “outdoor” hallway. Also in this space is the 4.5 ton 16 SEER Trane high-efficiency heat pump that conditions living areas.


MyGreenBuildings www.MyGreenBuildings.com specializes in high-performance, artistically designed structures using sustainable materials and socially responsible practices. Read more about this company online at www.greenbuildermag.com

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