This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
THE INSIDE SCOOP
GREEN BUILDER RECOMMENDS
No matter what siding type you choose, proper installation and flashing is key to maintaining its integrity and beauty. Some products can be installed by a layman with a hammer and nails (wood siding) but others, such as EIFS and fiber cement, should be installed by a professional. Problem areas for most siding products include: where it meets a chimney; where it supports downspouts; under eaves; where holes are created for cable, vents, or pipes; at ground level; around doors and windows; and where it is in contact with bushes and trees.


 


VIRTUES
> Product is straighter than wood siding
> Superior stability, which keeps the building envelope crack-free
> Lower cost than wood
> Low-maintenance product; holds paint for several years longer than wood (7–15 years)
> Won’t rot, buckle, or warp


CAVEATS
> Heavier than most sidings and can crack
> Negligible R value
> High embodied energy because of manufacturing process
> Moisture problems can result from installation errors
> Requires special safety training, special gear to protect against airborne silica, and specific cutting tools.


 


EIFS STUCCO ON STEROIDS
Stucco is well-known building product in many regions of the country, but you can get the same stucco look with more insulation value by using EIFS (exterior insulation finish system).


A recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory study looked at how EIFS walls stacked up against brick, glass, stucco, concrete, wood, and masonry. EIFS posted a higher R-value than the others at R-12.9.


EIFS can control temperature and moisture within the wall system and outperforms many other claddings. Because it is applied to the outside of a home, it is an option for both new homes and retrofits.


The product’s carbon footprint as compared with other common claddings is five times lower than brick and three times lower than stucco, says a National Institute of Standards and Technology analysis.


EIFS is commonly thought of as a stucco-look product, but manufacturers have gotten creative with their finishes. Dryvit Outsulation system comes in Custom Brick and “Lymestone” finish and BASF has an attractive “AnticoGlaze” finish, reminiscent of the Tuscany region in Italy.


VIRTUES
> Adds insulation to the exterior of a home
> Finishes other than stucco look available
> Less expensive than stucco
> Liquid applied barrier blocks moisture


CAVEATS
> Imperative that it be installed and flashed correctly
> Must be installed by a trained professional
|> Can dent and crack if hit by a ball or other object


 


SING INSULATED LOG HOME WALL
The Sing Square Log with quarter sawing process is a double-wall, double tongue-and-groove square log sandwiched with Sing Honeycomb core for high strength and insulation value. The beautiful finish allows you to save money by using it as the interior wall and outside cladding. Can be used as finished floor, too. www.singloghomes.com


LP SMARTSIDE
Smartside products deliver the warmth and beauty of traditional wood, plus the durability and workability of engineered wood. Themanufacturing process creates products that are engineered for strength, performance, and protection against fungal decay and termites. Features four product collections, backed by a 5/50-year transferable limited warranty. www.lpcorp.com/smartside.com


28
GreenBuilder 11.2010

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78