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METAL DECADES OF PERFORMANCE
Set aside any visions of cheap tin roofs. Today’s metal roofing—most of it made from recycled steel—is a lot tougher and aesthetically appealing than the corrugated sections that shelter shacks and barns.


That said, metal roofing (above) still makes a distinct fashion statement. Long rows of sleek metal, separated by slight ridges (called standing seam) are a departure from tiles and shingles. Metal’s market share in single-family housing has more than tripled (to 7%) since 2004.


That’s partly because metal roofing has a strong environmental story, when you consider the amount of recycled steel it contains, its durability (usually 50 years or longer), and the fact that the material can be 100% recycled at end of life.


More recently, the metal roofing industry has introduced cool roof finishes that reflect the sun’s infrared light to reduce heat absorption into the structure by as much as 36%; some manufacturers have also partnered with thin-film solar electric suppliers to create integrated solar arrays within the panel channels, to generate renewable energy.


The industry has also expanded its styling, forming, and coloring panels to simulate curved clay tiles or individual shingle shapes to create more traditional looks for a broader range of housing styles.


VIRTUES
> High durability
> Infrared finishes reflect heat
> High recycled content
> 100% recyclable
> Fireproof


CAVEATS
> Higher initial cost
> Susceptible to impact or walking damage
> Colors may fade


GLOSSARY OF TERM
KNOW THE LINGO
> Deck
The substrate over which roofing is applied. Usually plywood, wood boards, or planks.


> Drip Edge
An installed lip that keeps shingles up off the deck at edges, and extends shingles out over eaves and gutters to prevent water from wicking up and under the shingles.


> Exposure 
The area on any roofing material that is left exposed to the elements.


> Flashing 
Materials used to waterproof a roof around any projections.


> Granules 
Crushed rock that is coated with a ceramic coating and fired, used as top surface on shingles.


> Ice Dam
Formed when snow melts on a roof and re-freezes at the eave areas. Ice dams force water to “back up” under shingles and cause leakage.


> Laminated Shingles
Asphalt-based shingles made from two separate pieces that are laminated together. Also called dimensional shingles or architectural shingles.


> Soffit Ventilation
Intake ventilation installed under the eaves or at the roof edge.


> Steep Slope Roofing
Refers to slopes steeper than a 4” rise for every 12” of length (expressed as 4:12).


> Tear-Off
Removal of existing roofing materials down to the roof deck.


> Valleys
Areas where two adjoining sloped roof planes intersect on a roof creating a “V” shaped depression.


Source: GAF Materials Corp.


 


ANBROOK CERTIFIED CEDAR
Wood roofing from Anbrook is harvested from Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) cedar forests and derived from trees not suitable for dimensional lumber, thus extending forest resources. Process waste is recycled into wood chips for pulp and paper manufacturing or mulch. Shingles are shipped in a biodegradable wrap. www.anbrook.com


BORAL MONIERLIFETILE CONCRETE TILES
MonierLifetile, a Boral Roofing company, announces Smog-Eating Technology, a new line of roofing tiles that neutralizes smog. The technology contains a catalyst embedded in the tile body that speeds the oxidation process when exposed to sunlight, resulting in reduced pollution. www.boralNA.com


19
GreenBuilder 11.2010

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